Plant of the Month for February, 2016

 (go-nee-oh-LY-mon  ta-TAR-ee-kum)

General Information:

Goniolimon tataricum is a special plant that is not grown for its flowers, but is grown for its dried flower head. It makes very small flowers which are hardly noticeable. When the flowers fade and the petals drop, you are left with a dried flower head that is spectacular. In fact it is so nice the plant is grown for the cut flower industry.

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

Goniolimon tataricum goes by several common names including statice, German statice and tatarian statice.

Flowers are pinkish white, but look white from a distance. After flowering in mid-summer, the remaining flower head looks good right into winter. This year I cut it off 2 weeks before Christmas and used the flower head in the holiday planter pictured below.

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

The plant is very low growing with the evergreen leaves lying right on the ground.

Goniolimon tataricumis very similar to Limonium platyphyllum (aka Limonium latifolium) which also has the common name of German statice. Goniolimon is distinguished from Limonium by having hairy styles and capitate stigmas. G. tataricum is shorter and has smaller flowers than L. platyphyllum.

The flower heads can be left on the plant for drying, or they can be removed just before flowering and hung in a dry cool place to dry.

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

Goniolimon tataricum; photo by Robert Pavlis

 

Life Cycle: perennial

Height: 45 cm (1.5 ft) with flower

Bloom Time: mid-summer

Natural Range: Mediterranean region, Caucasus

Habitat: coastal and desert environments

Synonyms:  Limonium tataricum. Limonium dumosum, Statice dumosa

 

Cultivation:

Light: full sun

Soil: well drained

Water: drought tolerant

USDA Hardiness Zone: (4?) 5 – 10

Propagation: seed

Seedex availability (ORG&HPS annual Seed Exchange): occasionally

 

      

A

Sow @ 20°C. Seed germinates within 3 months.
Robert Pavlis